Pentagon skirted U.S. law on human rights abuses in Afghanistan

According to a new report from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, the Pentagon used an exception indicated for security and continued to offer “choose training, devices, and other support to a few of the Afghan systems linked” in events of abuse.

Jan. 23 (UPI)– The U.S. company managing Afghanistan restoration stated in a report Tuesday that the State and Defense Departments skirted U.S. human rights laws by economically backing Afghan security forces implicated of abuses. The report from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction stated that both departments avoided Leahy Laws, continuing funding regardless of reliable accusations of “gross infractions of human rights,” consisting of child rape.

Leahy Laws forbid the companies from offering financial backing and military help to foreign security forces that break human rights with impunity. According to the report, the Pentagon used an exception suggested for security and continued to supply “choose training, devices, and other support to a few of the Afghan systems linked” in occurrences of abuse.

The “regardless of stipulation” in the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund arrangement of the Department of Defense Appropriations Act is indicated to permit the military to continue funding systems implicated of human rights abuses if it is figured out to be needed for security. Nevertheless, members of Congress found the use to be improper and it was gotten rid of from the spending plan. The new SIGAR report stated 12 Afghan security force systems linked in 14 occurrences in 2013 continued to get assistance.

9 other Afghan systems were also linked. Up until November 2011, military workers were not needed to report child sexual assault by Afghan security forces. SIGAR also found that there were no standards for figuring out whether allegations were trustworthy or when they must activate the Leahy Law.

SIGAR found that U.S. Forces-Afghanistan did not issue clear assistance and training to workers on the best ways to report child sexual attack till a September 2015 report by the New York Times in-depth widespread claims of sexual assault of kids by members of the Afghan National Army and police. The Department of Defense’s detective general then started its own examination. In its report last November, the Pentagon’s inspector general recognized 16 claims of child sexual assault including Afghan security forces reported by U.S. and Afghan soldiers from 2010 to 2016.